Kindus

YOUR INFORMATION SECURITY PARTNER OF CHOICE

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At Kindus, we live and breathe IT security and information risk. We know security is complicated and difficult, not least because every member of our team has dedicated their career (and much more besides) to learning it, feeling it, breathing it, and understanding what make...
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$50 - $99/hr
10 - 49
2010
United Kingdom
Kindus
YOUR INFORMATION SECURITY PARTNER OF CHOICE
0.00/5 (0 Reviews)
On the cusp of technology evolution, the industries are experiencing a paradigm shift in their infrastructure and process handling. One technology that is persistently playing a prominent role in this transformation is “Blockchain Technology.” Despite critics defaming it as one of the most overhyped technology and labeling it as “the new tech-bubble” it has emerged as the dark horse, and in the year 2020, it seems industries will be looking forward to adopting blockchain in their processes. Blockchain is one type of distributed ledger. In other words, it is a type of database that is shared, replicated, and synchronized among the members of a decentralized network. Initially, blockchain technology was envisaged as the public transaction ledger for cryptocurrencies. But beside cryptocurrency, the profound attributes of it make Blockchain a strong contender to replace the traditional methods of how business processes or operations are conducted. Blockchain could fundamentally change the financial sector, manufacturing, government, and energy and a few others to add in the list. Industries on Blockchain's Radar Insurance Sector Claim processing is a lengthy and complicated process. It requires the participation of several stakeholders and intermediaries before considering the claim request final and proceeding with the payment. This complicated process could bring to an end with Blockchain. By integrating all the stakeholders around a distributed ledger infrastructure and implementing the smart contracts for all necessary checks and verifications, the claim process can speed up including, calculation and validation of the amount to be paid. Supply Chain The mobile phone or oven you use in house detours an entire supply chain cycle before it reaches you. A supply chain involves transporting the raw materials from a supplier to a manufacturer and eventually ends by dropping the final product to the customer. However, a traditional supply chain has certain drawbacks like a single shipment of goods involving around 20-30 people or organizations in the process. It may lead to unnecessary delays and complications. Blockchain can help avert unnecessary delays and disputes by preventing goods from getting stuck in the supply chain. The chances of misplacements become less as each product can be tracked in real-time. It also provides transparency in documenting the paperwork as everyone will be on the same page, and any discrepancies could be easily identified. Besides contributing to tracking orders, receipts, and payments, it helps to track digital assets such as warranties and licenses in a unified way. Banking and Financial Sector The modern banking system has embraced technology with their open hands. However, their key concern for cyber attacks cannot be overruled. In 2016, $81 million was stolen from the Bangladesh Central Bank through cyber-attack. After failing with all other security measures, it seems blockchain could be the answer to this. It can act as an armor against cyber attacks. The financial institutes can share security infrastructure to each other over blockchain, so all have robust and uniform security measures against cyber-attacks. All in the network can participate in enhancing security. Besides security, blockchain can also validate customer information like KYC in the most secure way and handle customers’ data on behalf of the entire financial ecosystem. The tampering of data in the blockchain is almost impossible, and 100% transparency in the transaction can be achieved. In fact, the speculations are made that Blockchain has the ability to replace the entire banking system someday. Manufacturing ( image source: pwc.com) Did you know that a commercial aircraft is made up of 300,000 parts? If any of these parts are not in shape, it could lead to a life and death situation for travelers. With current technology, it is not possible to track each and every component. But blockchain can track the provenance of individual components and see the condition of these parts in real-time. The manufacturers can identify the deformities in the parts early-on and thus reduce the risk of mishaps. Note that they can even improve the product in their production plant to last longer. It will also help to reduce the cost of after-sale services. This is not just for aircrafts manufacturers; it could be applicable to any manufacturing industry, maybe its automotive, electronics, chemicals, textiles, and so on. However, there lies one challenge for manufacturers. They might have to overhaul their existing infrastructure, which may be a lengthy process. Energy Sector As per one of the reports, the energy firms are observing the higher energy cost and increased revenues. To deal with this energy sector, it needs smart management and decentralized control. It even includes advanced communication and data exchanges between different parts of the power network. They have seen these possibilities within the blockchain technology. The early blockchain developers are establishing transactional digital platforms that can be completely decentralized and can enable P2P energy trading. It means consumers can interchange surplus energy to each other, pretty much like you share food with your neighbors. It can also generate automated billing for consumers and stand as a pay-as-you-go solution. Apart from this, with the help of artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain technology can identify consumer energy patterns and propose a value-added energy product provision. Energy grid laced with IoT and Blockchain could further help to reduce energy consumption, for instance, smart meters, advanced sensors, network monitoring equipment, etc. Government ( Image source: researchgate.net) Blockchain has wide use cases in the Government sector. It can be used for building smart cities, central banking, payroll tax collection, validation of education and professional qualifications, tracking vaccinations, tracking loans and student grants, holding elections, etc. The Election Commission of India joined hands with the Indian Institute of Technology to create a blockchain system for voting. The new system enables Indians to vote even when they are away from their hometowns. It helps the government sector to eliminate tax fraud, bureaucracy, and confusing regulations. Healthcare Lack of innovation has least done to improve the overall health of the patient. The healthcare industry works more or less the same way as it used to work two decades ago. One of the grey areas of health care is unmanaged clinical data. Today, the patient data is found scattered all over the places such as labs, doctor’s clinics, pharmacies, and hospitals. There is no common record or place to find all detail with pin-point accuracy. During an emergency, the doctors have to turnover a stack of files to check the patient’s history and medication to proceed with the treatment. Any lapse in patient information could risk patient life. Also, patient’s detail all over the place could compromise their confidentiality. To manage healthcare data at one place securely and improve the life-span of patient Blockchain-based ecosystem is envisioned as the door to hope. One such example is UK based MEDICALCHAIN, which has developed a blockchain through which doctors, hospitals, and laboratories can all request patient information that has a record of the origin and protects the patient's identity from outside sources. One more example, more recently, amid the Coronavirus outbreak, the Chinese government has used blockchain technology to archive medical data, track the supply of virus prevention materials, and consult the public. IoT In the past, we have seen technologies complementing each other to enhance the end-user experience. It seems IoT and Blockchain have the same camaraderie. IoT’s ability to connect all your devices and to command them with a couple of sensors is incredible. However, the risk of data theft always remains with IoT. To this, Blockchain could be the solution. Pavo, the IoT & blockchain solution for the agricultural sector, believes that farmers can achieve optimal agricultural efficiency with it. The data gathered from Pavo’s IoT hardware device installed on farms gets stored on the blockchain in a secure environment. It allows farmers to optimize farming techniques by looking at the captured information, while retailers, distributors, and consumers can make informed decisions about buying a specific crop or food item. Also, the Pavo marketplace enables farmers to pre-sell crops through blockchain smart contracts, which means farmers don’t have to wait for payment after harvest. Just as blockchain, the IoT has a broad spectrum of industry for its usage. Together, they can impact logistics & supply chain, health care, pharmaceuticals, and so on. Besides the above industries, Blockchain has shown a strong affinity towards other sectors like real-estate, international trade and commodities, law, media and entertainment, sports & esports.
On the cusp of technology evolution, the industries are experiencing a paradigm shift in their infrastructure and process handling. One technology that is persistently playing a prominent role in this transformation is “Blockchain Technology.” Despite critics defaming it as one of the most overhyped technology and labeling it as “the new tech-bubble” it has emerged as the dark horse, and in the year 2020, it seems industries will be looking forward to adopting blockchain in their processes. Blockchain is one type of distributed ledger. In other words, it is a type of database that is shared, replicated, and synchronized among the members of a decentralized network. Initially, blockchain technology was envisaged as the public transaction ledger for cryptocurrencies. But beside cryptocurrency, the profound attributes of it make Blockchain a strong contender to replace the traditional methods of how business processes or operations are conducted. Blockchain could fundamentally change the financial sector, manufacturing, government, and energy and a few others to add in the list. Industries on Blockchain's Radar Insurance Sector Claim processing is a lengthy and complicated process. It requires the participation of several stakeholders and intermediaries before considering the claim request final and proceeding with the payment. This complicated process could bring to an end with Blockchain. By integrating all the stakeholders around a distributed ledger infrastructure and implementing the smart contracts for all necessary checks and verifications, the claim process can speed up including, calculation and validation of the amount to be paid. Supply Chain The mobile phone or oven you use in house detours an entire supply chain cycle before it reaches you. A supply chain involves transporting the raw materials from a supplier to a manufacturer and eventually ends by dropping the final product to the customer. However, a traditional supply chain has certain drawbacks like a single shipment of goods involving around 20-30 people or organizations in the process. It may lead to unnecessary delays and complications. Blockchain can help avert unnecessary delays and disputes by preventing goods from getting stuck in the supply chain. The chances of misplacements become less as each product can be tracked in real-time. It also provides transparency in documenting the paperwork as everyone will be on the same page, and any discrepancies could be easily identified. Besides contributing to tracking orders, receipts, and payments, it helps to track digital assets such as warranties and licenses in a unified way. Banking and Financial Sector The modern banking system has embraced technology with their open hands. However, their key concern for cyber attacks cannot be overruled. In 2016, $81 million was stolen from the Bangladesh Central Bank through cyber-attack. After failing with all other security measures, it seems blockchain could be the answer to this. It can act as an armor against cyber attacks. The financial institutes can share security infrastructure to each other over blockchain, so all have robust and uniform security measures against cyber-attacks. All in the network can participate in enhancing security. Besides security, blockchain can also validate customer information like KYC in the most secure way and handle customers’ data on behalf of the entire financial ecosystem. The tampering of data in the blockchain is almost impossible, and 100% transparency in the transaction can be achieved. In fact, the speculations are made that Blockchain has the ability to replace the entire banking system someday. Manufacturing ( image source: pwc.com) Did you know that a commercial aircraft is made up of 300,000 parts? If any of these parts are not in shape, it could lead to a life and death situation for travelers. With current technology, it is not possible to track each and every component. But blockchain can track the provenance of individual components and see the condition of these parts in real-time. The manufacturers can identify the deformities in the parts early-on and thus reduce the risk of mishaps. Note that they can even improve the product in their production plant to last longer. It will also help to reduce the cost of after-sale services. This is not just for aircrafts manufacturers; it could be applicable to any manufacturing industry, maybe its automotive, electronics, chemicals, textiles, and so on. However, there lies one challenge for manufacturers. They might have to overhaul their existing infrastructure, which may be a lengthy process. Energy Sector As per one of the reports, the energy firms are observing the higher energy cost and increased revenues. To deal with this energy sector, it needs smart management and decentralized control. It even includes advanced communication and data exchanges between different parts of the power network. They have seen these possibilities within the blockchain technology. The early blockchain developers are establishing transactional digital platforms that can be completely decentralized and can enable P2P energy trading. It means consumers can interchange surplus energy to each other, pretty much like you share food with your neighbors. It can also generate automated billing for consumers and stand as a pay-as-you-go solution. Apart from this, with the help of artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain technology can identify consumer energy patterns and propose a value-added energy product provision. Energy grid laced with IoT and Blockchain could further help to reduce energy consumption, for instance, smart meters, advanced sensors, network monitoring equipment, etc. Government ( Image source: researchgate.net) Blockchain has wide use cases in the Government sector. It can be used for building smart cities, central banking, payroll tax collection, validation of education and professional qualifications, tracking vaccinations, tracking loans and student grants, holding elections, etc. The Election Commission of India joined hands with the Indian Institute of Technology to create a blockchain system for voting. The new system enables Indians to vote even when they are away from their hometowns. It helps the government sector to eliminate tax fraud, bureaucracy, and confusing regulations. Healthcare Lack of innovation has least done to improve the overall health of the patient. The healthcare industry works more or less the same way as it used to work two decades ago. One of the grey areas of health care is unmanaged clinical data. Today, the patient data is found scattered all over the places such as labs, doctor’s clinics, pharmacies, and hospitals. There is no common record or place to find all detail with pin-point accuracy. During an emergency, the doctors have to turnover a stack of files to check the patient’s history and medication to proceed with the treatment. Any lapse in patient information could risk patient life. Also, patient’s detail all over the place could compromise their confidentiality. To manage healthcare data at one place securely and improve the life-span of patient Blockchain-based ecosystem is envisioned as the door to hope. One such example is UK based MEDICALCHAIN, which has developed a blockchain through which doctors, hospitals, and laboratories can all request patient information that has a record of the origin and protects the patient's identity from outside sources. One more example, more recently, amid the Coronavirus outbreak, the Chinese government has used blockchain technology to archive medical data, track the supply of virus prevention materials, and consult the public. IoT In the past, we have seen technologies complementing each other to enhance the end-user experience. It seems IoT and Blockchain have the same camaraderie. IoT’s ability to connect all your devices and to command them with a couple of sensors is incredible. However, the risk of data theft always remains with IoT. To this, Blockchain could be the solution. Pavo, the IoT & blockchain solution for the agricultural sector, believes that farmers can achieve optimal agricultural efficiency with it. The data gathered from Pavo’s IoT hardware device installed on farms gets stored on the blockchain in a secure environment. It allows farmers to optimize farming techniques by looking at the captured information, while retailers, distributors, and consumers can make informed decisions about buying a specific crop or food item. Also, the Pavo marketplace enables farmers to pre-sell crops through blockchain smart contracts, which means farmers don’t have to wait for payment after harvest. Just as blockchain, the IoT has a broad spectrum of industry for its usage. Together, they can impact logistics & supply chain, health care, pharmaceuticals, and so on. Besides the above industries, Blockchain has shown a strong affinity towards other sectors like real-estate, international trade and commodities, law, media and entertainment, sports & esports.

On the cusp of technology evolution, the industries are experiencing a paradigm shift in their infrastructure and process handling. One technology that is persistently playing a prominent role in this transformation is “Blockchain Technology.”

Despite critics defaming it as one of the most overhyped technology and labeling it as “the new tech-bubble” it has emerged as the dark horse, and in the year 2020, it seems industries will be looking forward to adopting blockchain in their processes.

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Blockchain is one type of distributed ledger. In other words, it is a type of database that is shared, replicated, and synchronized among the members of a decentralized network. Initially, blockchain technology was envisaged as the public transaction ledger for cryptocurrencies. But beside cryptocurrency, the profound attributes of it make Blockchain a strong contender to replace the traditional methods of how business processes or operations are conducted. Blockchain could fundamentally change the financial sector, manufacturing, government, and energy and a few others to add in the list.

Industries on Blockchain's Radar

Insurance Sector

Claim processing is a lengthy and complicated process. It requires the participation of several stakeholders and intermediaries before considering the claim request final and proceeding with the payment. This complicated process could bring to an end with Blockchain. By integrating all the stakeholders around a distributed ledger infrastructure and implementing the smart contracts for all necessary checks and verifications, the claim process can speed up including, calculation and validation of the amount to be paid.

Supply Chain

The mobile phone or oven you use in house detours an entire supply chain cycle before it reaches you. A supply chain involves transporting the raw materials from a supplier to a manufacturer and eventually ends by dropping the final product to the customer. However, a traditional supply chain has certain drawbacks like a single shipment of goods involving around 20-30 people or organizations in the process. It may lead to unnecessary delays and complications. Blockchain can help avert unnecessary delays and disputes by preventing goods from getting stuck in the supply chain. The chances of misplacements become less as each product can be tracked in real-time. It also provides transparency in documenting the paperwork as everyone will be on the same page, and any discrepancies could be easily identified. Besides contributing to tracking orders, receipts, and payments, it helps to track digital assets such as warranties and licenses in a unified way.

Banking and Financial Sector

The modern banking system has embraced technology with their open hands. However, their key concern for cyber attacks cannot be overruled. In 2016, $81 million was stolen from the Bangladesh Central Bank through cyber-attack. After failing with all other security measures, it seems blockchain could be the answer to this. It can act as an armor against cyber attacks. The financial institutes can share security infrastructure to each other over blockchain, so all have robust and uniform security measures against cyber-attacks. All in the network can participate in enhancing security. Besides security, blockchain can also validate customer information like KYC in the most secure way and handle customers’ data on behalf of the entire financial ecosystem. The tampering of data in the blockchain is almost impossible, and 100% transparency in the transaction can be achieved. In fact, the speculations are made that Blockchain has the ability to replace the entire banking system someday.

Manufacturing

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( image source: pwc.com)

Did you know that a commercial aircraft is made up of 300,000 parts? If any of these parts are not in shape, it could lead to a life and death situation for travelers. With current technology, it is not possible to track each and every component. But blockchain can track the provenance of individual components and see the condition of these parts in real-time. The manufacturers can identify the deformities in the parts early-on and thus reduce the risk of mishaps. Note that they can even improve the product in their production plant to last longer. It will also help to reduce the cost of after-sale services. This is not just for aircrafts manufacturers; it could be applicable to any manufacturing industry, maybe its automotive, electronics, chemicals, textiles, and so on. However, there lies one challenge for manufacturers. They might have to overhaul their existing infrastructure, which may be a lengthy process.

Energy Sector

As per one of the reports, the energy firms are observing the higher energy cost and increased revenues. To deal with this energy sector, it needs smart management and decentralized control. It even includes advanced communication and data exchanges between different parts of the power network. They have seen these possibilities within the blockchain technology. The early blockchain developers are establishing transactional digital platforms that can be completely decentralized and can enable P2P energy trading. It means consumers can interchange surplus energy to each other, pretty much like you share food with your neighbors. It can also generate automated billing for consumers and stand as a pay-as-you-go solution. Apart from this, with the help of artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain technology can identify consumer energy patterns and propose a value-added energy product provision. Energy grid laced with IoT and Blockchain could further help to reduce energy consumption, for instance, smart meters, advanced sensors, network monitoring equipment, etc.

Government

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( Image source: researchgate.net)

Blockchain has wide use cases in the Government sector. It can be used for building smart cities, central banking, payroll tax collection, validation of education and professional qualifications, tracking vaccinations, tracking loans and student grants, holding elections, etc. The Election Commission of India joined hands with the Indian Institute of Technology to create a blockchain system for voting. The new system enables Indians to vote even when they are away from their hometowns. It helps the government sector to eliminate tax fraud, bureaucracy, and confusing regulations.

Healthcare

Lack of innovation has least done to improve the overall health of the patient. The healthcare industry works more or less the same way as it used to work two decades ago. One of the grey areas of health care is unmanaged clinical data. Today, the patient data is found scattered all over the places such as labs, doctor’s clinics, pharmacies, and hospitals. There is no common record or place to find all detail with pin-point accuracy. During an emergency, the doctors have to turnover a stack of files to check the patient’s history and medication to proceed with the treatment. Any lapse in patient information could risk patient life. Also, patient’s detail all over the place could compromise their confidentiality. To manage healthcare data at one place securely and improve the life-span of patient Blockchain-based ecosystem is envisioned as the door to hope. One such example is UK based MEDICALCHAIN, which has developed a blockchain through which doctors, hospitals, and laboratories can all request patient information that has a record of the origin and protects the patient's identity from outside sources. One more example, more recently, amid the Coronavirus outbreak, the Chinese government has used blockchain technology to archive medical data, track the supply of virus prevention materials, and consult the public.

IoT

In the past, we have seen technologies complementing each other to enhance the end-user experience. It seems IoT and Blockchain have the same camaraderie. IoT’s ability to connect all your devices and to command them with a couple of sensors is incredible. However, the risk of data theft always remains with IoT. To this, Blockchain could be the solution. Pavo, the IoT & blockchain solution for the agricultural sector, believes that farmers can achieve optimal agricultural efficiency with it. The data gathered from Pavo’s IoT hardware device installed on farms gets stored on the blockchain in a secure environment. It allows farmers to optimize farming techniques by looking at the captured information, while retailers, distributors, and consumers can make informed decisions about buying a specific crop or food item. Also, the Pavo marketplace enables farmers to pre-sell crops through blockchain smart contracts, which means farmers don’t have to wait for payment after harvest. Just as blockchain, the IoT has a broad spectrum of industry for its usage. Together, they can impact logistics & supply chain, health care, pharmaceuticals, and so on.

Besides the above industries, Blockchain has shown a strong affinity towards other sectors like real-estate, international trade and commodities, law, media and entertainment, sports & esports.

As a software company , we tested arround 10 hosting services. All are worst. I think for best solution you can go with AWS, or Google cloud services. 
As a software company , we tested arround 10 hosting services. All are worst. I think for best solution you can go with AWS, or Google cloud services. 

As a software company , we tested arround 10 hosting services. All are worst. I think for best solution you can go with AWS, or Google cloud services. 

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Kindus
The Elsie Whiteley Innovation Centre, Hopwood Lane, Halifax, Leeds, West Yorkshire HX5 1ER
United Kingdom
44 1422 400 153
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