Particle

IOT IS HARD. WE MAKE IT EASY

5.00/5 (2 Reviews)
About Particle
At Particle, we make tools for engineers and designers to create amazing new experiences through internet-connected hardware. We offer a suite of hardware and software tools to help you prototype, scale, and manage your Internet of Things products.
$50 - $99/hr
50 - 249
2012
Particle
IOT IS HARD. WE MAKE IT EASY
5.00/5 (2 Reviews)
1 Review
Client Reviews
Ronald CzacharaReviewed 1 month ago
All-In-One IoT Solutio
Role: Co-founder at at Derdack GmbH
Reviewed 1 month ago by Ronald Czachara
Role: Co-founder at at Derdack GmbH
All-In-One IoT Solutio
Complete IoT solution with platform, integration and even hardware devices.

What do you like most about the company?

Great customer service and support.

Rating breakdown
Quality
Reliability
Ability
Overall
Other details
Services:
IoT Development
Project Budget:
$0 to $10000
Project Duration:
1 Weeks
Project Status:
In progress
Research Rank
Research Rank
Reviews
Portfolio
Market Penetration
Experience
IoT Development
UI/ UX
49/60
8.25
8.25
8.00
8.00
8.25
8.25
Services

Connectivity, Wi-Fi, Internet of Things, Infrastructure Management, and M2M

Focus
Service Focus
Discussions
I would have phrased the question better. Will try to provide short answers to all questions part by part from my perspective:Where is BI going? Short answer: BI is going places, and gong there fast. In my 2010 BI model, we valued the BI software market at about $7.2 billion, growing at a global rate of 6.5% on an average, which is significant compared to more established enterprise technologies. I expect BI to increasingly make an entry into iel smith emerging markets, especially China, India, and Latin America. @Unnati Chauhan BI is going to every single enterprise application and delivering more value than the sum of parts. With Ent. Search, it is helping answer casual user queries. With BPM, it is providing perspective to CEP. What are the biggest problems with the existing established players, and how are startups trying to disrupt them?As with all establishments, the problems are of sustainable growth, keeping BI relevant to the needs of a changing demographic of end-users, being on the forefront of business issues, and noticing trends. Some of the common issues are:    Dealing with semi-structured data, and how to include the same in analysis  How to best use user-generated social content  How to deal with the sheer growth in the volume of enterprise and social data  How to better integrate into other information management technologies and enterprise applications  How to come as close to real-time (right-time, if you will) as required  How to deal with Big Data   This is obviously not an exhaustive list.Startups: One very successful startup that came into prominence in the last few years is Qliktech, which defined a radical approach to data analysis doing away with OLAP cubes. Some other companies are trying to come up with newer ways of data visualization. Some such as Jasper and Pentaho are open-source representations of BI. Newer players have BIRT as a starting point, so building a solution becomes less cumbersome. Still others are innovating with in-memory, in-database, MPP driven architectures and analytical databases.
I would have phrased the question better. Will try to provide short answers to all questions part by part from my perspective:Where is BI going? Short answer: BI is going places, and gong there fast. In my 2010 BI model, we valued the BI software market at about $7.2 billion, growing at a global rate of 6.5% on an average, which is significant compared to more established enterprise technologies. I expect BI to increasingly make an entry into iel smith emerging markets, especially China, India, and Latin America. @Unnati Chauhan BI is going to every single enterprise application and delivering more value than the sum of parts. With Ent. Search, it is helping answer casual user queries. With BPM, it is providing perspective to CEP. What are the biggest problems with the existing established players, and how are startups trying to disrupt them?As with all establishments, the problems are of sustainable growth, keeping BI relevant to the needs of a changing demographic of end-users, being on the forefront of business issues, and noticing trends. Some of the common issues are:    Dealing with semi-structured data, and how to include the same in analysis  How to best use user-generated social content  How to deal with the sheer growth in the volume of enterprise and social data  How to better integrate into other information management technologies and enterprise applications  How to come as close to real-time (right-time, if you will) as required  How to deal with Big Data   This is obviously not an exhaustive list.Startups: One very successful startup that came into prominence in the last few years is Qliktech, which defined a radical approach to data analysis doing away with OLAP cubes. Some other companies are trying to come up with newer ways of data visualization. Some such as Jasper and Pentaho are open-source representations of BI. Newer players have BIRT as a starting point, so building a solution becomes less cumbersome. Still others are innovating with in-memory, in-database, MPP driven architectures and analytical databases.

I would have phrased the question better. Will try to provide short answers to all questions part by part from my perspective:

Where is BI going? Short answer: BI is going places, and gong there fast. In my 2010 BI model, we valued the BI software market at about $7.2 billion, growing at a global rate of 6.5% on an average, which is significant compared to more established enterprise technologies. I expect BI to increasingly make an entry into iel smith emerging markets, especially China, India, and Latin America. @Unnati Chauhan
BI is going to every single enterprise application and delivering more value than the sum of parts. With Ent. Search, it is helping answer casual user queries. With BPM, it is providing perspective to CEP.

What are the biggest problems with the existing established players, and how are startups trying to disrupt them?
As with all establishments, the problems are of sustainable growth, keeping BI relevant to the needs of a changing demographic of end-users, being on the forefront of business issues, and noticing trends. Some of the common issues are:  

  1.  Dealing with semi-structured data, and how to include the same in analysis 
  2. How to best use user-generated social content 
  3. How to deal with the sheer growth in the volume of enterprise and social data 
  4. How to better integrate into other information management technologies and enterprise applications 
  5. How to come as close to real-time (right-time, if you will) as required 
  6. How to deal with Big Data  

This is obviously not an exhaustive list.

Startups: One very successful startup that came into prominence in the last few years is Qliktech, which defined a radical approach to data analysis doing away with OLAP cubes. Some other companies are trying to come up with newer ways of data visualization. Some such as Jasper and Pentaho are open-source representations of BI. Newer players have BIRT as a starting point, so building a solution becomes less cumbersome. Still others are innovating with in-memory, in-database, MPP driven architectures and analytical databases.

Contact information
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